Demystifying the Digital World – Part 6

The previous post in this series provided some compelling reasons to ditch Windows for the Google Chromebook. Chromebooks are inexpensive, easy to switch to (especially if you already use the Chrome browser), secure, and have long battery life. Why even consider an alternative like the Apple iPad?

There are several reasons. Maybe the most important of which is that using a Chromebook implies that you are not only trusting Google’s cloud computing system, but also giving Google access to your data. Despite all the businesses Google is involved in, at its heart it is an advertising company. Your data is used to tailor ads delivered to you and others. That’s the price we have always paid for “free” Google Search, YouTube, Gmail, Maps, Photos, Cloud Storage, etc.

Apple on the other hand has made it perfectly clear that “Apple’s customers are not its product” and they go to great lengths to be transparent about privacy issues. However, more compelling than vague discussions about privacy is the fact that if you use an iPhone, the iPad can run the same high quality apps. This is a MAJOR advantage over the Chromebook. Take a photo on your iPhone and it magically appears on the beautiful screen of the iPad. The same for bookmarks, contacts, calendars, reminders, notes, text messages, passwords, and the other bits and pieces of our digital lives. Sure Google can do this as well, but an iPhone paired with an iPad is a powerful, very well integrated combination. You don’t even have to pay for the app again. If you bought it for your phone, you can use it on you iPad for free.

The iPad also has outstanding technical support of AppleCare, 90 days are included and up to two years if you choose to purchase it. Even though I’ve rarely used it, I have always found AppleCare to be the best support in the technology world. Even their post-support surveys reflect their commitment to helping people solve their problems quickly and painlessly. In the screenshot of a survey below, Apple asks about “Compassion for your situation.” How many times has a tech problem been so frustrating that a little compassion by the support person would have been just the ticket?

Other benefits of the iPad include a wonderful size, excellent battery life, and high quality hardware that is supported by software updates from Apple for years. While the lack of a physical keyboard is an issue for some people, it comes in handy on cramped flights and makes the iPad much easier to hold for long periods of time. Like any high tech product though, the iPad is not without its issues. Copy and paste can be fiddly and file management is still a bit obscure since apps typically have not supported files the same way a laptop does. Also, the iPad doesn’t have proper “windows.” Apps take up the whole screen with one exception called “split screen” which is awkward to use.

Can the iPad replace a windows laptop? The answer is a definite yes. I sometimes go days without touching my desktop computer. Is it worth the extra cost? An entry level iPad costs only $329 compared to an entry level Chromebook’s that range from $199 to $299. Not much difference considering the risk involved. Is a Chromebook from Asus better than Acer, how about Samsung or HP, which model has the better screen, keyboard, warranty, reliability rating, etc.? There is such a thing as a Google Chromebook. It is called the Pixelbook and starts at $999, a whole different category of pricing.  If you buy an iPad, you get an Apple iPad, period.

So there’s less reason than ever to keep struggling along with a Windows based computer. If you’re still not convinced, buy an iPad. Apple has a 15 day, no questions asked return policy. If you live near an Apple Store, make an appointment at the Genius Bar to help you get started. I’m 95% sure that you won’t be taking advantage of that return policy.

The next post in this series will be discussing a slightly different topic, demystifying one of the most challenging parts of the high tech world: watching TV! Stay tuned!